Darlene Foster's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Pompeii

I am delighted with the response to my travel challenge series. Thanks for all the comments and guesses.

The photo from Day 8 was from Pompeii, Italy which many of you guessed. When I was in elementary school, I read a book about the eruption of Mount Vesuvius that buried the city of Pompeii under volcanic ash. Since then I always wanted to visit the site of the disaster that has been uncovered almost intact. I was not disappointed as I wandered amongst the ruins and envisioned the people living there two thousand years ago. Here is a blog post I wrote about my visit, along with more pictures. (not easy to get pictures without other tourists in them but I managed)

https://darlenefoster.wordpress.com/2016/02/06/walking-with-the-dead-through-the-ruins-of-pompeii/

I was nominated by my blogging friend Geoff LePard at TanGental to post one favourite travel picture a day for ten days without explanation, then to nominate someone else to participate. That’s 10 days, 10 travel pictures, and 10 nominations. It doesn´t have to be 10 consecutive days. Thanks, Geoff and thanks to everyone for playing alongIn these times, vicarious travel is a great escape.

Today I nominate Three Sisters Abroad. This interesting blog follows three Australian sisters as they enjoy travelling together.

If I nominate you and you don’t want to participate, please do not feel obliged, but if you do, please link back to me so that I can see your post. I would love to see what you choose to post.

This is my picture for day 9. If you want to guess where this is, leave your answer in the comments or just comment on the picture.

Walking through the unearthed remains of a once thriving city, I couldn’t help feeling ominous. People lived and worked in Pompeii until that fateful day, August 24, 79 AD, when Mount Vesuvius erupted, dumping twenty feet of ash on the city, completely burying it. The city lay undisturbed and hidden until  1748 when it was accidentally discovered and later excavated. Today it is a must see on most bucket lists and I am pleased to be able to check it off mine. I remember learning about this disaster in elementary school and imagining the terror of the inhabitants. The feeling was still with me as I peered into the well preserved homes with original mosaics, shops, temples and gardens of the ancient Romans. Here is some of what we saw.

Mount Vesuvius

Mount Vesuvius from the ship

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Original mosaic in a courtyard

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Public water fountain

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Public water fountains

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The forum

The forum

another mosaic

Another original mosaic

A bakery

A bakery

 

Mosaic and gardens of a wealthy homeowner

Mosaic and gardens of a wealthy home owner

Pompei, Italy

The Temple of Jupiter

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The dancing Faun

During the excavation, plaster was used to fill in the voids in the ash layers that once held human bodies. This allowed people to see the exact position the person was in when he or she died. Some of these macabre plaster casts were on display and drove home the horror of the catastrophe.

Pompei, Italy

Holding up a pillar in Pompeii, Italy

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Watching our steps as we traverse the uneven cobblestones

Walking along the old lumpy streets and dodging the many other onlookers was treacherous. One had to be careful, but I was pleased to be there, honouring the poor souls who lost their lives in one of the ancient world’s worst natural disasters.

I have since read the book, Pompeii, by Robert Harris. An excellent account of that fateful day from the point of view of an aquarius, someone who maintained the aqueducts. Having walked the streets, the book had special meaning to me.

Have you ever visited a place you had read about before? Did you feel the same when you actually saw it, as when you first learned about it?

 


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