Darlene Foster's Blog

Author Archive

I will be away from blogging for a while as I am off to Canada to launch Amanda in New Mexico, do presentations and book signings in Vancouver, Delta, Calgary and Medicine Hat, visit with family and friends and stock up on Tim Hortons!! I’ll miss my blogging community but will check in from time to time.

Thanks so much to all of you who read my blog, like it, comment and share it. Time is limited and there are many great blogs out there to read, so I feel honoured that you take the time to read mine. I am so lucky to have such an awesome following.

I will leave you with the trailer to Amanda in New Mexico – Ghosts in the Wind

Laura Best and I have been blogging buddies since we both had stories in the same anthology back in 2010. She is a fabulous writer of books set in Nova Scotia. I am pleased to be featured on her blog. Check it out!

Laura Best

Today, it is my pleasure to welcome author Darlene Foster to my blog. Several years back, Darlene and I were published in the Country Roads anthology together. Ever since that time we’ve been following each other on social media. Darlene is a wonderful supporter to other authors and an all round terrific author and person and I’m thrilled to have her as a guest on my blog.

Brought up on a ranch in southern Alberta, Darlene Foster dreamt of writing, travelling the world and meeting interesting people. It’s no surprise that she’s now an award-winning author of the exciting Amanda Travels series featuring spunky 12 year-old Amanda Ross who loves to travel to unique places. Readers of all ages enjoy travelling with Amanda as she unravels one mystery after another. Darlene divides her time between the west coast of Canada and the Costa Blanca, in Spain with her husband and…

View original post 542 more words

I hope you are not getting bored with my visit to Cordoba but there was so much to see and do in this fascinating city.  I must tell you about our visit to the Jewish Quarter and the fabulous museum we found there.

Cordoba Jewish Quarter

The walls surrounding the Jewish Quarter in Cordoba

The Jewish Quarter in Cordoba, or Juderia as it is called, is a walled area surrounding a complex network of narrow streets lined with white buildings. With a quintessential Andalusian flavour, it is a perfect place to wander around and soak up the atmosphere.

DSCN9082

A typical street in the ancient Jewish quarter

DSCN9092

At the centre of the quarter is the Synagogue. It is one of only three original synagogues remaining in Spain. The building, built in the Mudejar style, dates from 1315. It was converted to a church in the 16th century and then held the Guild of Shoemakers until it was rediscovered in the 19th Century.

DSCN9093

The entrance to the Synagogue

DSCN9083

The interior includes restored walls revealing plaster work with inscriptions from Hebrew psalms and plant motifs.

DSCN9086

DSCN9088

The Jewish community played an important role in the history of Spain and flourished in Cordoba during the Moorish times when the city was the centre for commerce, prosperity, education and religious tolerance. Unfortunately, in 1492, during the Spanish Inquisition, people of the Jewish faith and the religion itself, were expelled from Spain. A sad part of Spanish history.

DSCN9128

Wandering the peaceful little streets and alleys, we came upon a sign on a door, Casa Andalusi. Intrigued, we decided to check it out. Were we in for a treat!

Once inside we were welcomed by a cosy and cool courtyard with the pleasant sound of water from its fountain,  a mixture of Arab-Spanish music in the background and the faint scent of greenery and fresh flowers.

DSCN9096

The charming courtyard of Casa Andalusi

 

DSCN9102
There were many more serene courtyards and fountains full of fresh flowers throughout the site.
DSCN9106
It was a typical 12th-century Andalusian house filled with medieval Islamic furniture and decorations. The blend of Andalusian and eastern styles gave it a certain charm and transported you back to Arabic times.
DSCN9113
DSCN9123
DSCN9095

Exquisite leather work.

DSCN9101

A leather globe of the world as it was known at the time. Amazing

I found one room, dedicated to the making of paper out of rags, very interesting.
DSCN9109
and I had to demonstrate
Cordoba
We were able to go down below the current house where we found items from the old houses of the Jewish quarter including a well and an unearthed Roman mosaic floor, proving just how old the site is.
DSCN9115
DSCN9121
The courtyards held an assortment of large pots. I was told if I didn´t behave, I would be put in one!
Cordoba5
This museum proved to be a gem tucked away and not on many of the tourist maps. We were so pleased we found it. It was the perfect end to a long, but fun day.
I hope you enjoyed the trip to Cordoba with me and my wonderful travel buddies.

 

 

I am a guest on Marcia Meara’s blog with an excerpt from Amanda in New Mexico – Ghosts in the Wind. Hop on over and see what Amanda is up to in New Mexico.

The Write Stuff

Here is an excerpt from the sixth book in the Amanda Travels series, Amanda in New Mexico – Ghosts in the Wind soon to be released.

9781771681209

Amanda stood in front of a door the map showed as the Santos Display Room.

“What’s in here?”

Along with Caleb and a couple of other students, she entered the dimly lit room containing glass cabinets filled with pictures and statues of various saints. A sign explained how the families in Spanish America always kept a shrine to a saint in their homes. The shrine often held Milagros, tiny silver shapes attached to statues of the saints. There were legs for people who couldn’t walk, eyes for those who had bad eyesight and animal figures to wish a farmer a productive year with his flock. Amanda was fascinated as she peered carefully through the glass at the small objects stuck on the figures.

She…

View original post 377 more words

Today I am a guest on Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo. Since I used to interview people for a living, I decided to interview Amanda. You may learn something new about her!

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

DF Hello Amanda. Thanks for agreeing to be interviewed as your readers are eager to learn more about you.

AR Thank you, Mrs. Foster. It is so awesome to be interviewed. I’ve never been interviewed before.

DF I used to be a recruiter and I interviewed people for a living, so I will start this interview like I always did. Can you please tell me a little about yourself?

AR Yes, thanks. I can do that. (Clears her throat) My name is Amanda Jane Ross and I live in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. I am in grade six and attend Guy Weadick Elementary.  It’s named after a cowboy who started the Calgary Stampede, you know. I live with my mom, Evelyn Ross and my dad, Don Ross. They are both accountants and work a lot. I enjoy cooking and trying new recipes. I love to read and I do some writing…

View original post 1,561 more words

After spending a morning at the amazing Mezquita, enjoying a delightful lunch and checking out the cute shops we ventured to the Alcazar, a medieval fortress of the Christian Kings, rebuilt in 1328 by King Alfonso XI. The word Alcázar means palace in Arabic. It was the residence of the Christian Kings when they stayed in Cordoba and was one of the primary residences of Isabella I of Castile and Ferdinand II of Aragon. Significant historic events were planned in this palace including the discovery of America. It was also the headquarters of the Inquisition and later served as a garrison for Napoleon Bonaparte’s troops in 1810. This intriguing place with a colourful history is now a World Heritage site.

DSCN8999

Battlements surrounding the Alcazar

DSCN9003

King Alfonso XI greets visitors to the Alcazar

DSCN9024

The round tower is the Tower of the Inquisition, added in the 15th century. The Main Tower in front was a place for the Inquisition to carry out its public executions.

DSCN9032

The gardens are a relaxing place to wander, with a wide variety of plants and trees overlooking stone fountains and large ponds

DSCN9053

Well kept gardens

The Moorish style Royal Baths are situated in the basement and are thought to have been built by Alfonso XI. The skylights in the shape of stars provided light and ventilation. The walls were made from hardened clay and some of the original marble floor slabs are still visible.

DSCN9047

Outside entrance to the Royal Bath House

DSCN9049

Entering the bath house in the basement

DSCN9051

Star shaped skylights for light and ventilation

Cordoba6

Inside the bath house. I may be touching a wall Queen Isabella touched.

Interesting 16th-century frescoes hang in a hall which housed the former chapel of the Inquisitions. A collection of Roman mosaic art and a sarcophagus from the 2nd and 3rd century that once belonged to a wealthy Roman Mansion, discovered under Corredera Square in 1959, are also on display.

DSCN9010

Interesting 16th-century frescoes

DSCN9007

2nd or 3rd-century sarcophagus

DSCN9026 (2)

Roman mosaic art discovered under a square in Cordoba

The Alcazar was yet another remarkable place to wander around and take in the history as we stepped back in time. Seeing places like this makes the history we learned in school come alive. It is no longer just stuff from textbooks but actual events and places. Queen Isabella walked these hallways, touched these walls and probably bathed in the bath house while deciding whether to fund the voyage of Christopher Columbus, which ultimately changed history. This is why travel means so much to me.

More to come as we visit the Jewish Quarter and a cool museum in Cordoba.

Thanks for travelling with me.

 

I was invited to be a guest on Jan Moore’s site Work on Your Own Terms

Jan’s site is dedicated to helping women enjoy meaningful work that fits their lifestyle and providing mentorship on midlife reinvention. Check it out, you will find it interesting.

Photo by Donna Cluff

Daydream Believer: You Can Be One Too

by  | Jul 17, 2017

I met Darlene shortly before she and her husband moved to Spain from Canada. I asked her to share a follow-up on her life Abroad and how it came about.

Guest Post by Darlene Foster

I can´t remember when I didn´t have the urge to travel and experience new worlds. My dear grandmother bought me a colouring book featuring children from around the world in traditional dress. I loved that book and wished, with each page I coloured, I could visit these places one day. Studies have proven daydreaming is good for young people because it plants seeds that often become reality. Of course, those dreams don´t come true without hard work and determination.

Read more here

http://workonyourownterms.com/daydream-believer-you-can-be-one-too/

Do you believe in daydreams?

 


click to purchase

click to purchase

click to purchase

click to purchase

Click to purchase

click to purchase

click to purchase

Pig on Trial

click to purchase

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6,017 other followers

Archives

Goodreads

click to read review